New Report: Buying Local Tools for Forward-Thinking Institutions

LOCO, the Columbia Institute and ISIS Research Centre at the UBC Sauder School of Business released a new report to influence increased local purchasing today. Buying Local: Tools for Forward-Thinking Institutions is a companion to The Power of Purchasing: The Economic Impacts of Local Procurement, released earlier this year, that quantified the benefit of purchasing from B.C.-based suppliers.

Around the world, institutional procurement is beginning to incorporate the value of local economic health and vitality. Here in Canada, local governments and school districts alone spend more than $65 billion annually on the procurement of goods and services. Cities and regions spend millions on economic development, and hundreds of millions on procurement, yet these efforts are rarely aligned. Important opportunities exist to benefit public, non-profit and private sector institutions as well as communities by shifting purchasing dollars towards local business. This report outlines strategies and paths that policy-makers, sustainability managers, procurement professionals and others involved in institutional purchasing decisions can pursue to realize this potential.

Around the world, there is a growing movement to support local economies, and various approaches are being taken in different places. Great benefits come from strong, resilient local economies, and many opportunities exist to take small steps that can majorly benefit our public institutions, businesses and communities. If purchasers are ready to take on leadership roles, the tools and solutions detailed here are effective ways to expand local purchasing and strengthen our communities.

Part I of this report outlines the argument for local procurement. It demonstrates the power that institutional procurement has over the economy and highlights opportunities for change by examining the current landscape in Canada, the United States, Australia and the United Kingdom. It details how local economic impacts fit within the definition of value when attempting to achieve best value in procurement.

Part II and Part II of the report identify tools that can be used by institutions and policy-makers to increase local procurement. They outline a number of challenges, and detail solutions that are currently being used. Examples of the tools have been included along with references to material for further research.

Download the report here.

About Amy Robinson

Comments

  1. I’m excited to share this report with decision-makers in Greater Victoria. I’m curious about how international trade agreements like CETA will affect efforts to have institutions do more local procurement. If you have a chance to drop me a line about that, I would appreciate it. My email is susan [..at..] communitycouncil dot ca.

  2. Hi Susan
    Thanks for the comment. Sorry for the late response. I’m happy to discuss with you. We are busy launching Buy Local Week (Dec 1-7), but I can talk in mid-December if that works for you.
    Best,
    Amy

  3. Hi there, You’ve done a great job. I’ll definitely digg it and personally suggest to my friends.
    I’m confident they’ll be benefited from this website.

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